Date of Award

5-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Kashama Mulamba

Second Advisor

Charles Perabeau

Third Advisor

Jeffrey S. Williamson

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Abstract

The paradigm shift in education with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards has created the opportunity for foreign language educators to evaluate appropriate and beneficial assessments for their students. This study investigated how first-year students in a Midwestern high school perceived three different alternative assessments in the foreign language classroom: Dynamic Assessment, Task-based Assessment, and Formative Assessment using self- and peer-evaluation. The researcher correlated the perceptions to the students’ assessment scores. Additionally, the researcher compared final exam scores of the control group to those of the experimental group. The results indicated that the experimental group students favorably perceived the alternative assessments types, chose Formative Assessment as their most preferred and Task-based Assessment as the least desired, and scored as well as the control group students on the final exam.

Comments

Ed.D. dissertation completed in 2015 for Olivet Nazarene University.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.