Date of Award

5-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Bert Jacobson

Second Advisor

H. Stanton Tuttle

Third Advisor

Jeffrey S. Williamson

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Community Application

Abstract

This researcher examined the perspectives of African American and Caucasian female protégés regarding the five career development mentoring functions of sponsoring, coaching, protecting, challenging, and exposing; and the six psychosocial mentoring functions of role modeling, acceptance, counseling, friendship, socializing, and parenting to examine African American and Caucasian female protégés’ perspectives on their mentors’ mentoring behaviors. The researcher also examined the perspectives of African American and Caucasian female protégés regarding the importance of race in their mentoring dyads. The results indicated that no statistically significant differences existed between the African American and Caucasian female protégés within the five career development mentoring functions. Statistically significant differences were identified within the psychosocial mentoring functions of acceptance and parenting. Statistically significant differences also existed between the African American and Caucasian female protégés’ overall scores for career development mentoring and psychosocial support mentoring regarding the importance of the mentor’s race. In both cases, the African American female protégés’ scores indicated that they rated the importance of the mentor’s race significantly higher than the Caucasian female participants rated the importance of the mentor’s race for career development and psychosocial support mentoring.

Comments

Ed.D. dissertation completed in 2015 for Olivet Nazarene University.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.