Presentation Title

An Examination of How Sleep and Employment Variables Relate to Academic Success Among University Students

Location

Reed 330

Start Date

18-4-2017 9:05 PM

Description

Author Abstract:

The goal of this research project is to identify whether or not there is a relationship between sleep, average hours students work, original motivation for employment and GPA. Previous research indicates a relationship between sleep and academic performance as well as a relationship between work habits and academic performance. This involved administering an online-format survey then performed a multiple regression analysis to determine whether average amount of sleep per week, quality of sleep, or original motivation for employment were significant predictors of GPA in students. The result of this study indicated that quality of sleep experienced by the student was a marginally significant predictor of GPA, when controlling for average number of hours worked and slept per week, along with age, approximate number of all-nighters pulled per semester. Additionally, follow-up analyses indicated that work variables and sleep quality variables were related to number of all-nighters in this college sample, suggesting the possibility of additional complex inter-relationships between sleep, work, and academics in this college sample.

Comments

Faculty mentor: Dr. Dale Smith

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Apr 18th, 9:05 PM

An Examination of How Sleep and Employment Variables Relate to Academic Success Among University Students

Reed 330

Author Abstract:

The goal of this research project is to identify whether or not there is a relationship between sleep, average hours students work, original motivation for employment and GPA. Previous research indicates a relationship between sleep and academic performance as well as a relationship between work habits and academic performance. This involved administering an online-format survey then performed a multiple regression analysis to determine whether average amount of sleep per week, quality of sleep, or original motivation for employment were significant predictors of GPA in students. The result of this study indicated that quality of sleep experienced by the student was a marginally significant predictor of GPA, when controlling for average number of hours worked and slept per week, along with age, approximate number of all-nighters pulled per semester. Additionally, follow-up analyses indicated that work variables and sleep quality variables were related to number of all-nighters in this college sample, suggesting the possibility of additional complex inter-relationships between sleep, work, and academics in this college sample.