Faculty Mentor(s)

Advisor Dr. Rosalie Tuttle

Reader Dr. Deb Bruley

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Other

Abstract

Novice Nurses are faced with the expectation that they be clinical leaders soon after graduation while educational programs are challenged with how to assist the student nurse in forming a strong sense of professional identity. The mixed methods, descriptive study used two established instruments, the Clinical Leadership Survey (CLS) and the Nurses Professional Values Scale -Revised (NPVS-R) to explore and compare the perceptions held by novice nurses who graduated from diploma, associate, baccalaureate, masters’ entry, and accelerated programs in a Midwestern state in order to assess the relationship between their self-perceived clinical leadership ability and their self-perceived sense of professional identity and what role, if any, academic preparation plays. In total, 239 participants completed the survey. The results demonstrated a positive significant relationship (r = .598, p < .001) between professional identity and the novice nurse's self-perceived clinical leadership ability. The author confirmed that there were differences in the self-perceived clinical leadership ability of novice nurses when educational preparation was considered (F(3, 228) = 3.82, p < .001, R2 = .05) however, educational preparation played no role in the novice nurse's sense of professional identity (F(3, 228) = 1.92, p = 1.21, R2 = .05).

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Nursing Commons

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Apr 21st, 1:30 PM Apr 21st, 1:45 PM

Relationship Between Professional Identity And Clinical Leadership In Novice Registered Nurses

Wisner Auditorium

Novice Nurses are faced with the expectation that they be clinical leaders soon after graduation while educational programs are challenged with how to assist the student nurse in forming a strong sense of professional identity. The mixed methods, descriptive study used two established instruments, the Clinical Leadership Survey (CLS) and the Nurses Professional Values Scale -Revised (NPVS-R) to explore and compare the perceptions held by novice nurses who graduated from diploma, associate, baccalaureate, masters’ entry, and accelerated programs in a Midwestern state in order to assess the relationship between their self-perceived clinical leadership ability and their self-perceived sense of professional identity and what role, if any, academic preparation plays. In total, 239 participants completed the survey. The results demonstrated a positive significant relationship (r = .598, p < .001) between professional identity and the novice nurse's self-perceived clinical leadership ability. The author confirmed that there were differences in the self-perceived clinical leadership ability of novice nurses when educational preparation was considered (F(3, 228) = 3.82, p < .001, R2 = .05) however, educational preparation played no role in the novice nurse's sense of professional identity (F(3, 228) = 1.92, p = 1.21, R2 = .05).