Faculty Mentor(s)

Advisor Dr. Roxanne Forgrave

Reader Dr. Sara Spruce

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presentation Type

Other

Abstract

This quantitative, quasi-experimental study examined the relationships between self-efficacy and reading achievement as mediated by an online instructional delivery system called MobyMax® over a period of time between a pretest and a posttest. The sources of self-efficacy were also investigated for the individual contribution of each of the four sources; process accomplishments or mastery experiences, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. Finally, the current study explored the relationships across gender and ethnicity (White, Black, Hispanic, and other). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to organize the data using a mixed factorial ANOVA to analyze the interventions’ and time factor’s impact on reading self-efficacy and reading achievement. A multiple regression was used to calculate the individual contribution of the four sources of self-efficacy on reading achievement, and a t-test to identify the mean differences across gender. Finally, a One-way ANOVA was used to identify the variance across ethnicities. One statistically significant finding was the mean differences between males and females in reading achievement on both the pretest as well as the posttest. All other findings were not statistically significant. MobyMax® was not shown to make a statistically significant difference, positive or negative, in reading achievement or self-efficacy. More research needs to be conducted to examine the relationship of self-efficacy and achievement in the elementary years.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 9:20 AM Apr 21st, 9:35 AM

The Impact of Online Instruction on Fourth Grade Students’ Reading Self-efficacy and Achievement

Wisner Auditorium

This quantitative, quasi-experimental study examined the relationships between self-efficacy and reading achievement as mediated by an online instructional delivery system called MobyMax® over a period of time between a pretest and a posttest. The sources of self-efficacy were also investigated for the individual contribution of each of the four sources; process accomplishments or mastery experiences, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. Finally, the current study explored the relationships across gender and ethnicity (White, Black, Hispanic, and other). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to organize the data using a mixed factorial ANOVA to analyze the interventions’ and time factor’s impact on reading self-efficacy and reading achievement. A multiple regression was used to calculate the individual contribution of the four sources of self-efficacy on reading achievement, and a t-test to identify the mean differences across gender. Finally, a One-way ANOVA was used to identify the variance across ethnicities. One statistically significant finding was the mean differences between males and females in reading achievement on both the pretest as well as the posttest. All other findings were not statistically significant. MobyMax® was not shown to make a statistically significant difference, positive or negative, in reading achievement or self-efficacy. More research needs to be conducted to examine the relationship of self-efficacy and achievement in the elementary years.