Faculty Mentor(s)

Adviser Dr. Bonnie J. Perry

Reader Dr. Roxanne Forgrave

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - MidAmerica

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presentation Type

Other

Abstract

This study explored the relationship between middle school English Language Learners (ELLs) and their level of connectedness to family, friends, school, and self. The purpose of the quantitative study was to determine if significant correlations occurred between middle school students’ level of English language acquisition and their reported level of connectedness to family, friends, school, and self. The study focused on ELL students enrolled in the sixth, seventh, and eighth grade at four middle schools located in a Midwest school district. The researcher placed the one hundred and twenty-six participants into three categories based on archived reading scores. The same ELL students completed The Hemingway: Measure of Adolescent Connectedness survey. Using a 5-point Likert scale, students responded to statements about their connection to family, friends, school, and self. Utilizing a Pearson bivariate correlation, the researcher sought to determine if a significant relationship occurred between the students’ connectedness scores and their level of language acquisition. By examining these relationships, the researcher gleaned information that would help public school districts meet the academic and social needs of ELL students. English Language Learners are the fastest growing segment of the K-12 population. This study was unique concerning the study of youth development paired with language acquisition.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Education Commons

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Mar 24th, 8:10 AM Mar 24th, 8:30 AM

Exploring The Relationship Between Connectedness And Language Acquisition For Middle School English Language Learners

MidAmerica

This study explored the relationship between middle school English Language Learners (ELLs) and their level of connectedness to family, friends, school, and self. The purpose of the quantitative study was to determine if significant correlations occurred between middle school students’ level of English language acquisition and their reported level of connectedness to family, friends, school, and self. The study focused on ELL students enrolled in the sixth, seventh, and eighth grade at four middle schools located in a Midwest school district. The researcher placed the one hundred and twenty-six participants into three categories based on archived reading scores. The same ELL students completed The Hemingway: Measure of Adolescent Connectedness survey. Using a 5-point Likert scale, students responded to statements about their connection to family, friends, school, and self. Utilizing a Pearson bivariate correlation, the researcher sought to determine if a significant relationship occurred between the students’ connectedness scores and their level of language acquisition. By examining these relationships, the researcher gleaned information that would help public school districts meet the academic and social needs of ELL students. English Language Learners are the fastest growing segment of the K-12 population. This study was unique concerning the study of youth development paired with language acquisition.