Date of Birth

2-12-1981

Date of Award

Spring 5-4-2020

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Ruth Reynolds

Second Advisor

Dr. Sara Spruce

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Abstract

Many college programs are designed to graduate individuals who are experts in their field of study, but not necessarily individuals who are trained in how to teach. This quantitative, quasi-experiment study examined college faculty member’s level of training in the area of teaching practices and methodology. The relation to student satisfaction, current course performance, attendance, the belief in the need for training, and faculty member’s sense of efficacy in teaching was explored. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to organize the data using a one-way ANCOVA to analyze the impact the level of training had on each area. Ninety-two faculty members and 405 students responded to the online survey, adapted from Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, and McKeachie (1991), Rosensitto (1999), Woolfolk and Hoy (1990), and Purdue Instructor Course Evaluation Service (2011). The researcher found statistically significant results for student satisfaction, current course performance and attendance. The faculty member’s belief in the need for teaching methodology training showed that 96% (n = 87) of the faculty surveyed felt there was a need to be trained to teach at the college level. It is recommended that college institutions develop a more formalized training program for faculty members. Further studies are needed to determine long-term impact on this training.

Key Findings

There was a significant difference in student satisfaction between the level of training when controlled for course performance and motivation.

There was as significant difference in current course performance between the level of training when controlled for motivation, type of degree, and number of absences.

There was a significant difference in current course performance between the level of training when controlled for current course performance.

There is NO significant relationship between perceived need and level of training with using covariates.

96% of faculty surveyed felt that more training is needed. Of the 4% of faculty members who felt the training was not needed, only 1 person had prior training experience (one workshop). The more training a faculty member had, the more they felt it was necessary.

There is NO significant relationship between faculty efficacy and level of training with using covariates.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Professional Biography

Nicole Baker has been working in higher education since 2007 where she developed a love and passion for teaching, development, and training. Nicole received her teaching methodology training from fourteen years in the elementary and middle school classrooms and now she is a Professor in the College of Education teaching others how to teach. Nicole was the recipient of the 2015 Faculty of the Year award.

Nicole resides in Dyer, Indiana with her husband and four kids.

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