Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kelly Brown

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Patient satisfaction, which has become a priority for hospitals and an indicator of quality, is a result of a patient’s perception of care. The consequences of not adequately providing high levels of patient satisfaction can be enormously costly to the greater healthcare system. The literature provided evidence that effective patient satisfaction is multifactorial; one key factor noted was nursing care. This study examined the relationship between patient satisfaction with nursing care and nursing job satisfaction. The researcher employed a quantitative correlational research design to find further evidence of this potential relationship. Ninety-eight patients participated in the study, as well as fifty-eight nurses. Patient participants completed the Newcastle Satisfaction of Nursing Scale survey about their perceptions of nursing care. Nurse participants completed the Paul Spector Job Satisfaction survey about their perceptions of job satisfaction. Analysis of the data revealed there was a statistically significant correlation between the two variables patient satisfaction with nursing care and nursing job satisfaction r=.26, n=58, p < .04. This study has implications for patient satisfaction research, and the attention to nursing job satisfaction in organizations. Moreover, this study has implications for the improvement of nursing work environments for the betterment of patient-satisfaction. Background, methodology, limitations, results, and implications for future research are discussed.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 6th, 11:40 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

The Relationship Between Patient Satisfaction With Nursing Care And Nursing Job Satisfaction

Wisner Auditorium

Patient satisfaction, which has become a priority for hospitals and an indicator of quality, is a result of a patient’s perception of care. The consequences of not adequately providing high levels of patient satisfaction can be enormously costly to the greater healthcare system. The literature provided evidence that effective patient satisfaction is multifactorial; one key factor noted was nursing care. This study examined the relationship between patient satisfaction with nursing care and nursing job satisfaction. The researcher employed a quantitative correlational research design to find further evidence of this potential relationship. Ninety-eight patients participated in the study, as well as fifty-eight nurses. Patient participants completed the Newcastle Satisfaction of Nursing Scale survey about their perceptions of nursing care. Nurse participants completed the Paul Spector Job Satisfaction survey about their perceptions of job satisfaction. Analysis of the data revealed there was a statistically significant correlation between the two variables patient satisfaction with nursing care and nursing job satisfaction r=.26, n=58, p < .04. This study has implications for patient satisfaction research, and the attention to nursing job satisfaction in organizations. Moreover, this study has implications for the improvement of nursing work environments for the betterment of patient-satisfaction. Background, methodology, limitations, results, and implications for future research are discussed.