Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Ruth Reynolds

Dr. Sara Spruce

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Many college programs are designed to graduate individuals who are experts in their field of study, but not necessarily individuals who are trained in how to teach. This quantitative, quasi-experiment study examined college faculty member’s level of training in the area of teaching practices and methodology. The relation to student satisfaction, current course performance, attendance, the belief in the need for training, and faculty member’s sense of efficacy in teaching was explored. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to organize the data using a one-way ANCOVA to analyze the impact the level of training had on each area. Ninety-two faculty members and 405 students responded to the online survey, adapted from Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, and McKeachie (1991), Rosensitto (1999), Woolfolk and Hoy (1990), and Purdue Instructor Course Evaluation Service (2011). The researcher found statistically significant results for student satisfaction, current course performance and attendance. The faculty member’s belief in the need for teaching methodology training showed that 96% (n = 87) of the faculty surveyed felt there was a need to be trained to teach at the college level. It is recommended that college institutions develop a more formalized training program for faculty members. Further studies are needed to determine long-term impact on this training.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 18th, 12:40 PM Apr 18th, 12:55 PM

The Impact of Teacher Methodology Training for Higher Education Faculty Members

Wisner Auditorium

Many college programs are designed to graduate individuals who are experts in their field of study, but not necessarily individuals who are trained in how to teach. This quantitative, quasi-experiment study examined college faculty member’s level of training in the area of teaching practices and methodology. The relation to student satisfaction, current course performance, attendance, the belief in the need for training, and faculty member’s sense of efficacy in teaching was explored. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to organize the data using a one-way ANCOVA to analyze the impact the level of training had on each area. Ninety-two faculty members and 405 students responded to the online survey, adapted from Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, and McKeachie (1991), Rosensitto (1999), Woolfolk and Hoy (1990), and Purdue Instructor Course Evaluation Service (2011). The researcher found statistically significant results for student satisfaction, current course performance and attendance. The faculty member’s belief in the need for teaching methodology training showed that 96% (n = 87) of the faculty surveyed felt there was a need to be trained to teach at the college level. It is recommended that college institutions develop a more formalized training program for faculty members. Further studies are needed to determine long-term impact on this training.