Presentation Title

Relationship between African American males’ confidence, perception of academia, and teacher relations

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Darcel Brady

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Community Application, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Graduation rates for African American males in the United States – from both high schools and institutions of higher education – continue to lag far behind those of Caucasian males. The purpose of this case study was to examine the influence of African American male college students’ confidence, their perceptions of academia, and their relationships with their teachers on the students’ academic careers. The nine participants of this study were first and second-year students attending a small, rural two-year, predominantly White midwestern college. They were randomly selected and individually interviewed. These young men experienced struggles with their identity; perceived prejudice from other students, as well as faculty and staff; and felt they were held to a different standard. Certainly, these African American students’ confidence, their perceptions of academia, and relationships with their professors (as well as administrators and staff) affected their ability to succeed in their educations. For the educational systems that run from kindergarten through college, to better support African American males in their educational journeys, it is critical that non-African American teachers become better trained in cultural awareness, confront their biases, and invest themselves in better understanding their students and their families of origin. In addition, African American males are desperate for the support of African American teachers, professors, administrators, and staff – adults who can inspire trust and confidence, listen without judgement, and invest themselves in helping cultivate their talents, hopes, and dreams.

Cohort XX

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 17th, 10:50 AM

Relationship between African American males’ confidence, perception of academia, and teacher relations

Wisner Auditorium

Graduation rates for African American males in the United States – from both high schools and institutions of higher education – continue to lag far behind those of Caucasian males. The purpose of this case study was to examine the influence of African American male college students’ confidence, their perceptions of academia, and their relationships with their teachers on the students’ academic careers. The nine participants of this study were first and second-year students attending a small, rural two-year, predominantly White midwestern college. They were randomly selected and individually interviewed. These young men experienced struggles with their identity; perceived prejudice from other students, as well as faculty and staff; and felt they were held to a different standard. Certainly, these African American students’ confidence, their perceptions of academia, and relationships with their professors (as well as administrators and staff) affected their ability to succeed in their educations. For the educational systems that run from kindergarten through college, to better support African American males in their educational journeys, it is critical that non-African American teachers become better trained in cultural awareness, confront their biases, and invest themselves in better understanding their students and their families of origin. In addition, African American males are desperate for the support of African American teachers, professors, administrators, and staff – adults who can inspire trust and confidence, listen without judgement, and invest themselves in helping cultivate their talents, hopes, and dreams.

Cohort XX