Presentation Title

The pandemic and personality: A cross-sectional comparison of personality trait scores

Project Type

Faculty Scholarship

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

While personality traits are thought to be stable, personality is also known to be the result of an interaction between dispositional and environmental factors. Because 2020 has introduced a number of unexpected and challenging situations into our society, we compared scores from three different indices (The 20-Item Mini-IPIP, Donnellan, Oswald, Baird, & Lucas, 2006; The Big Five Test, Brody & Ehrlichman, 1998; & the Big Five Inventory, John & Srivastava, 1999) of openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism for three different cohorts (2018, 2019, & 2020). We did not suspect any changes in terms of openness to experience, conscientiousness, or extraversion across the three cohorts. However, we thought it was possible that agreeableness scores would be lower for 2020. We also expected neuroticism scores to be higher for 2020. Results indicated that there were no significant differences for any of the personality traits across the three different cohorts. Results will be discussed in light of an interactionist view of personality, states versus traits, and the psychometric properties of these three inventories.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
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Apr 12th, 5:00 PM Apr 12th, 5:20 PM

The pandemic and personality: A cross-sectional comparison of personality trait scores

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Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

While personality traits are thought to be stable, personality is also known to be the result of an interaction between dispositional and environmental factors. Because 2020 has introduced a number of unexpected and challenging situations into our society, we compared scores from three different indices (The 20-Item Mini-IPIP, Donnellan, Oswald, Baird, & Lucas, 2006; The Big Five Test, Brody & Ehrlichman, 1998; & the Big Five Inventory, John & Srivastava, 1999) of openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism for three different cohorts (2018, 2019, & 2020). We did not suspect any changes in terms of openness to experience, conscientiousness, or extraversion across the three cohorts. However, we thought it was possible that agreeableness scores would be lower for 2020. We also expected neuroticism scores to be higher for 2020. Results indicated that there were no significant differences for any of the personality traits across the three different cohorts. Results will be discussed in light of an interactionist view of personality, states versus traits, and the psychometric properties of these three inventories.