Presentation Title

Investigating relationships between religion, politics, self-compassion, and attitudes toward social justice

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kristian Veit

Project Type

Student Scholarship

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Weber Center, Room 101

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to expand upon previous research that looks at the relationship between religiosity and attitudes towards social justice while assessing the concept of spirituality known as self-compassion. Additionally, attitudes towards prisoners and demographics that include religious identity, ethnicity, and political affiliation were assessed. Undergraduate students at Olivet Nazarene University voluntarily participated in the study and anonymously completed an 81-item survey that assessed scores relating to self-compassion, attitudes towards social justice, and attitudes towards prisoners and reported their religious identity, political affiliation, and ethnicity. Multiple regression was used to assess self-compassion scores based on sanctification of social justice scores and attitudes towards prisoner scores. Tentative results indicate no significant relationship between self-compassion scores and attitudes towards prisoners score. Tentative results also indicate a significant relationship between sanctification of social justice scores and self-compassion scores.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 16th, 4:30 PM Apr 16th, 4:50 PM

Investigating relationships between religion, politics, self-compassion, and attitudes toward social justice

Other

Presentation Location: Weber Center, Room 101

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to expand upon previous research that looks at the relationship between religiosity and attitudes towards social justice while assessing the concept of spirituality known as self-compassion. Additionally, attitudes towards prisoners and demographics that include religious identity, ethnicity, and political affiliation were assessed. Undergraduate students at Olivet Nazarene University voluntarily participated in the study and anonymously completed an 81-item survey that assessed scores relating to self-compassion, attitudes towards social justice, and attitudes towards prisoners and reported their religious identity, political affiliation, and ethnicity. Multiple regression was used to assess self-compassion scores based on sanctification of social justice scores and attitudes towards prisoner scores. Tentative results indicate no significant relationship between self-compassion scores and attitudes towards prisoners score. Tentative results also indicate a significant relationship between sanctification of social justice scores and self-compassion scores.