Presentation Title

Caffeine Consumption as a Predictor of Academic Achievement, Procrastination, and Stress in Undergraduate Students

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kristian Veit

Project Type

Student Scholarship

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

Caffeine has become a substantial part of diets in the U.S. Past research has studied the relationship between energy drinks and academic achievement in college students. However, little research has been done to measure the relationship between caffeine intake and variables like stress and procrastination. Our research study explores the relationship between caffeine consumption, academic achievement, procrastination, and stress among undergraduate college students. Undergraduate university students (N = 45) completed Landrum’s (2001) Caffeine Consumption Questionnaire-Revised, the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (Solomon & Rothblum, 1984), and the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (Buysse, Reynolds, Monk, Berman, & Kupfer, 1989) was also included in our survey so that we could statistically control for sleep. Participants also provided their grade point average and responded to several demographic questions. Our data have been collected, and we will be analyzing our research questions at the bivariate level using Pearson’s correlation. The Bonferroni correction will be applied to control for familywise error rate.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 12th, 6:10 PM Apr 12th, 6:30 PM

Caffeine Consumption as a Predictor of Academic Achievement, Procrastination, and Stress in Undergraduate Students

Other

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

Caffeine has become a substantial part of diets in the U.S. Past research has studied the relationship between energy drinks and academic achievement in college students. However, little research has been done to measure the relationship between caffeine intake and variables like stress and procrastination. Our research study explores the relationship between caffeine consumption, academic achievement, procrastination, and stress among undergraduate college students. Undergraduate university students (N = 45) completed Landrum’s (2001) Caffeine Consumption Questionnaire-Revised, the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (Solomon & Rothblum, 1984), and the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (Buysse, Reynolds, Monk, Berman, & Kupfer, 1989) was also included in our survey so that we could statistically control for sleep. Participants also provided their grade point average and responded to several demographic questions. Our data have been collected, and we will be analyzing our research questions at the bivariate level using Pearson’s correlation. The Bonferroni correction will be applied to control for familywise error rate.