Presentation Title

Impact of infant’s cranial bones on magnetoencephalography

Project Type

Faculty Scholarship

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is practically useful instrument for human neuroimaging research because it is relatively unaffected by the tissue composition and the anatomical structure overlaying human brain. However, this is true only when the human head is assumed a spherically symmetric shape. A structural distortion such as cranial holes may invalidate the assumption, hence deteriorate the accuracy in MEG source reconstruction. This study investigated the influence of the distortion by simulating MEG with infant head models in the early development that feature the formation and closing of anterior fontanel. In overall, the signal difference between the distorted and the intact is approximately < 6% but the extensively depends on the dipole source configuration, thickness and conductivity of cranial bone, and fontanel size. In conclusion, MEG analysis can simplify the brain source reconstruction even with cranial bone distortion but should carefully considered for some instances due to the dependency mentioned above.

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Apr 13th, 3:30 PM Apr 13th, 3:50 PM

Impact of infant’s cranial bones on magnetoencephalography

Other

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is practically useful instrument for human neuroimaging research because it is relatively unaffected by the tissue composition and the anatomical structure overlaying human brain. However, this is true only when the human head is assumed a spherically symmetric shape. A structural distortion such as cranial holes may invalidate the assumption, hence deteriorate the accuracy in MEG source reconstruction. This study investigated the influence of the distortion by simulating MEG with infant head models in the early development that feature the formation and closing of anterior fontanel. In overall, the signal difference between the distorted and the intact is approximately < 6% but the extensively depends on the dipole source configuration, thickness and conductivity of cranial bone, and fontanel size. In conclusion, MEG analysis can simplify the brain source reconstruction even with cranial bone distortion but should carefully considered for some instances due to the dependency mentioned above.