Presentation Title

Impact of Mindfulness Training on Test Anxiety in College Students

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kristian Veit

Project Type

Faculty Scholarship

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

A considerable number of studies have investigated the relationship between mindfulness techniques and the reduction of anxiety; a smaller number of these studies have looked at test anxiety. Previous studies have used multiple mindfulness techniques to measure the impacts on test anxiety, but few have isolated mindfulness trainings to compare the relative impact of each type on anxiety. The present study isolated two different types of mindfulness trainings to analyze their impact on test anxiety compared to each other and a control group. Three sections of biblical scripture classes were used. Students in each class were asked to participate in the study by completing the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) and a short form of the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI—5). These baseline measures were given to every class before any trainings and again at the end of data collection. In the weeks between measures, students heard a class-specific mindfulness training three times. Data was analyzed using a two-way mixed ANOVA in Jamovi to compare baseline and posttreatment scores in mindfulness and test anxiety. Mindfulness increased significantly at the posttest level, while there was no significant difference in test anxiety. The different training conditions did not have a significant impact on mindfulness or test anxiety.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 12th, 4:35 PM Apr 12th, 4:55 PM

Impact of Mindfulness Training on Test Anxiety in College Students

Other

Presentation Location: Warming House, Olivet Nazarene University

Abstract

A considerable number of studies have investigated the relationship between mindfulness techniques and the reduction of anxiety; a smaller number of these studies have looked at test anxiety. Previous studies have used multiple mindfulness techniques to measure the impacts on test anxiety, but few have isolated mindfulness trainings to compare the relative impact of each type on anxiety. The present study isolated two different types of mindfulness trainings to analyze their impact on test anxiety compared to each other and a control group. Three sections of biblical scripture classes were used. Students in each class were asked to participate in the study by completing the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) and a short form of the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI—5). These baseline measures were given to every class before any trainings and again at the end of data collection. In the weeks between measures, students heard a class-specific mindfulness training three times. Data was analyzed using a two-way mixed ANOVA in Jamovi to compare baseline and posttreatment scores in mindfulness and test anxiety. Mindfulness increased significantly at the posttest level, while there was no significant difference in test anxiety. The different training conditions did not have a significant impact on mindfulness or test anxiety.