Presentation Title

Religiosity and relational anxiety: A cross-denominational study

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kristian Veit

Project Type

Honors Program project

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Presentation Location: Weber Center, Room 101

Abstract

Background: Prior research has provided evidence for a correlation between religiosity and anxiety, quantifiable differences between denominations, and a somewhat equivocal link between religiosity and social trust.

Methods: This present study seeks to extend the existing body of knowledge by assessing the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and both trait and relational anxiety across denominational groups, and by measuring the relationship between relational anxiety and social trust. Participants (N = 1,905) were asked to provide their informed consent as well as basic demographic information and answers to four surveys.

Results: Analysis revealed a modest negative relationship between intrinsic religiosity and trait anxiety. Overall, a weak, positive relationship between intrinsic religiosity and relational anxiety was indicated, but a negative relationship was found for several denominations. Significant differences were observed in these correlations between Protestant Christians and Catholic Christians. Last, it was found that social trust and relational anxiety were not related.

Conclusion: Two of the hypotheses were supported by the data, while two were not. One significant finding is that the relationships between intrinsic religiosity and trait and relational anxiety differed depending on participants’ denominational affiliation.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 16th, 5:45 PM Apr 16th, 6:00 PM

Religiosity and relational anxiety: A cross-denominational study

Other

Presentation Location: Weber Center, Room 101

Abstract

Background: Prior research has provided evidence for a correlation between religiosity and anxiety, quantifiable differences between denominations, and a somewhat equivocal link between religiosity and social trust.

Methods: This present study seeks to extend the existing body of knowledge by assessing the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and both trait and relational anxiety across denominational groups, and by measuring the relationship between relational anxiety and social trust. Participants (N = 1,905) were asked to provide their informed consent as well as basic demographic information and answers to four surveys.

Results: Analysis revealed a modest negative relationship between intrinsic religiosity and trait anxiety. Overall, a weak, positive relationship between intrinsic religiosity and relational anxiety was indicated, but a negative relationship was found for several denominations. Significant differences were observed in these correlations between Protestant Christians and Catholic Christians. Last, it was found that social trust and relational anxiety were not related.

Conclusion: Two of the hypotheses were supported by the data, while two were not. One significant finding is that the relationships between intrinsic religiosity and trait and relational anxiety differed depending on participants’ denominational affiliation.