Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kelly Brown

Project Type

EdD Colloquium - ONU

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The current study utilized a convergent mixed method design to examine Grit and Academic Capital in first (n = 80) and continuing-generation (n = 35) doctoral students. Specifically, the researcher was interested in comparing the two factors of Grit: passion and perseverance and the eight aspects of Academic Capital: concerns about cost, supportive networks, navigation of systems, trustworthy information, college knowledge, overcoming barriers, family uplift, and family expectations to determine how each contributes to first-generation doctoral student persistence. Data were collected online using the Short Grit Scale (Duckworth & Quinn, 2019) and the Academic Capital Scale (Winkler & Sriram, 2015). Data analysis included descriptive statistics, 10 independent sample t-tests, and a deductive-inductive reasoning procedure. Results indicated there was not a statistically significant difference between first- and continuing-generation doctoral students in either factor of Grit (passion and perseverance). However, a statistically significant difference between first- and continuing-generation doctoral students was discovered in five of the eight factors of Academic Capital: college knowledge (p = .001), supportive networks (p = .004), family expectation (p = .012), concerns about cost (p = .043), and overcoming barriers (p = .054). Both first- and continuing-generation doctoral students attributed their educational success to having a supportive network. Suggestions for improving first-generation doctoral student persistence were included along with recommendations for future research.

Cohort XX

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Education Commons

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Apr 17th, 10:10 AM

An Examination of Grit And Academic Capital In First And Continuing-Generation Doctoral Students

Wisner Auditorium

The current study utilized a convergent mixed method design to examine Grit and Academic Capital in first (n = 80) and continuing-generation (n = 35) doctoral students. Specifically, the researcher was interested in comparing the two factors of Grit: passion and perseverance and the eight aspects of Academic Capital: concerns about cost, supportive networks, navigation of systems, trustworthy information, college knowledge, overcoming barriers, family uplift, and family expectations to determine how each contributes to first-generation doctoral student persistence. Data were collected online using the Short Grit Scale (Duckworth & Quinn, 2019) and the Academic Capital Scale (Winkler & Sriram, 2015). Data analysis included descriptive statistics, 10 independent sample t-tests, and a deductive-inductive reasoning procedure. Results indicated there was not a statistically significant difference between first- and continuing-generation doctoral students in either factor of Grit (passion and perseverance). However, a statistically significant difference between first- and continuing-generation doctoral students was discovered in five of the eight factors of Academic Capital: college knowledge (p = .001), supportive networks (p = .004), family expectation (p = .012), concerns about cost (p = .043), and overcoming barriers (p = .054). Both first- and continuing-generation doctoral students attributed their educational success to having a supportive network. Suggestions for improving first-generation doctoral student persistence were included along with recommendations for future research.

Cohort XX