Presentation Title

Should the juvenile justice system be abolished?

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Shelly Stroud, moderator

Project Type

Student Scholarship

Presentation Type

Round Table/Panel

Abstract

Debate location: Centennial Chapel

Abstract

Join members of the Juvenile Justice class as they debate:

  • Grace Krueger
  • Riley Kaufman
  • Jackson Howell
  • Ashton Borger
  • Skyler Ford
  • Cassandra Pichardo
  • Quinton Haines
  • Gabby Bonnin
  • Brooke Cramer
  • Travis Miller - Mediator

The juvenile justice system seeks to rehabilitate children, rather than punish them for their criminal behavior. However, the question is raised, has the juvenile justice system failed in its efforts to rehabilitate rather than punish juveniles?

Since the late 1970s, critics of the juvenile courts have sought to abolish this system, arguing that it has failed in its rehabilitation efforts by not punishing serious criminal behavior of juveniles. At the same time defenders of the system contend it is only a minority of juveniles that commit violent offenses and for the majority the system is worthwhile in addressing their problems. Drugs, gangs, and the availability of guns have led to juveniles committing many serious crimes, including murder. This has led critics to Critics assert juvenile courts are no longer adequate in addressing these issues.

Research shows violent subcultures and early childhood trauma caused by abuse and neglect and early exposure to violence greatly increases the risk of behavioral issues in children. Due to this if the criminal justice system were adequately funded, probation and court personnel might be able to provide more intense supervision and rehabilitation efforts. By placing more energy into changing the socioeconomic situation of communities, rehabilitation efforts would improve and crime might decrease.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 10:30 AM Apr 15th, 11:30 AM

Should the juvenile justice system be abolished?

Other

Debate location: Centennial Chapel

Abstract

Join members of the Juvenile Justice class as they debate:

  • Grace Krueger
  • Riley Kaufman
  • Jackson Howell
  • Ashton Borger
  • Skyler Ford
  • Cassandra Pichardo
  • Quinton Haines
  • Gabby Bonnin
  • Brooke Cramer
  • Travis Miller - Mediator

The juvenile justice system seeks to rehabilitate children, rather than punish them for their criminal behavior. However, the question is raised, has the juvenile justice system failed in its efforts to rehabilitate rather than punish juveniles?

Since the late 1970s, critics of the juvenile courts have sought to abolish this system, arguing that it has failed in its rehabilitation efforts by not punishing serious criminal behavior of juveniles. At the same time defenders of the system contend it is only a minority of juveniles that commit violent offenses and for the majority the system is worthwhile in addressing their problems. Drugs, gangs, and the availability of guns have led to juveniles committing many serious crimes, including murder. This has led critics to Critics assert juvenile courts are no longer adequate in addressing these issues.

Research shows violent subcultures and early childhood trauma caused by abuse and neglect and early exposure to violence greatly increases the risk of behavioral issues in children. Due to this if the criminal justice system were adequately funded, probation and court personnel might be able to provide more intense supervision and rehabilitation efforts. By placing more energy into changing the socioeconomic situation of communities, rehabilitation efforts would improve and crime might decrease.