Presentation Title

The Department of Behavioral Sciences: Selected Student Research Projects

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kristian Veit

John Adams

Project Type

Student Scholarship

Scholarship Domain(s)

Scholarship of Discovery

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This session features undergraduate research projects conducted by students in the Department of Behavioral Sciences. Specifically, psychology majors in pursuit of their Bachelor of Science degrees belong to one of two research laboratory groups and will complete a Quantitative Research Project of their own choosing. For this session, select students from undergraduate research laboratories supervised by Dr. John Adams and Dr. Kristian Veit will present their projects.

Janelle Parish will be presenting her study entitled, “Investigating Attitudes Toward the COVID-19 Booster Shot.”

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact of source credibility on attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot, as well as the relationships between vaccine hesitancy (VH), political party affiliation (PPA), and attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot. It was hypothesized that participants in the high credibility condition would have more favorable attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot than participants in the low credibility condition, there would be a negative relationship between VH and attitudes toward the booster shot, and that those who tend toward the right politically would have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot. A convenience sample of undergraduate students (N = 69) took part in this one-way between-subjects experiment. Using an independent samples t-test, results showed no significant differences between the high credibility and low credibility conditions on booster shot attitudes. However, those with higher VH tended to have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (r = -0.77, p = < .001). In addition, participants who had a right-leaning PPA had a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (rs = -0.58, p= < .001). These findings may provide further implications for analyzing COVID-19 booster shot behaviors. Seeking a correlation between these elements from a larger demographic for a wider range of political affiliations would benefit from future research as well.

This study examines the impact of source credibility on attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot, as well as the relationships between vaccine hesitancy (VH), political party affiliation (PPA), and attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot. It was hypothesized that participants in the high credibility condition would have more favorable attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot than participants in the low credibility condition, there would be a negative relationship between VH and attitudes toward the booster shot, and that those who tend toward the right politically would have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot. A convenience sample of undergraduate students (N = 69) took part in this one-way between-subjects experiment. Using an independent samples t-test, results showed no significant differences between the high credibility and low credibility conditions on booster shot attitudes. However, those with higher VH tended to have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (r = -0.77, p = < .001). In addition, participants who had a right-leaning PPA had a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (rs = -0.58, p = < .001). These findings may provide further implications for analyzing COVID-19 booster shot behaviors. Seeking a correlation between these elements from a larger demographic for a wider range of political affiliations would benefit from future research as well.

Permission type

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 7th, 6:00 PM Apr 7th, 6:40 PM

The Department of Behavioral Sciences: Selected Student Research Projects

Reed 330

This session features undergraduate research projects conducted by students in the Department of Behavioral Sciences. Specifically, psychology majors in pursuit of their Bachelor of Science degrees belong to one of two research laboratory groups and will complete a Quantitative Research Project of their own choosing. For this session, select students from undergraduate research laboratories supervised by Dr. John Adams and Dr. Kristian Veit will present their projects.

Janelle Parish will be presenting her study entitled, “Investigating Attitudes Toward the COVID-19 Booster Shot.”

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact of source credibility on attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot, as well as the relationships between vaccine hesitancy (VH), political party affiliation (PPA), and attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot. It was hypothesized that participants in the high credibility condition would have more favorable attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot than participants in the low credibility condition, there would be a negative relationship between VH and attitudes toward the booster shot, and that those who tend toward the right politically would have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot. A convenience sample of undergraduate students (N = 69) took part in this one-way between-subjects experiment. Using an independent samples t-test, results showed no significant differences between the high credibility and low credibility conditions on booster shot attitudes. However, those with higher VH tended to have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (r = -0.77, p = < .001). In addition, participants who had a right-leaning PPA had a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (rs = -0.58, p= < .001). These findings may provide further implications for analyzing COVID-19 booster shot behaviors. Seeking a correlation between these elements from a larger demographic for a wider range of political affiliations would benefit from future research as well.

This study examines the impact of source credibility on attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot, as well as the relationships between vaccine hesitancy (VH), political party affiliation (PPA), and attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot. It was hypothesized that participants in the high credibility condition would have more favorable attitudes toward the COVID-19 booster shot than participants in the low credibility condition, there would be a negative relationship between VH and attitudes toward the booster shot, and that those who tend toward the right politically would have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot. A convenience sample of undergraduate students (N = 69) took part in this one-way between-subjects experiment. Using an independent samples t-test, results showed no significant differences between the high credibility and low credibility conditions on booster shot attitudes. However, those with higher VH tended to have a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (r = -0.77, p = < .001). In addition, participants who had a right-leaning PPA had a more negative attitude toward the booster shot (rs = -0.58, p = < .001). These findings may provide further implications for analyzing COVID-19 booster shot behaviors. Seeking a correlation between these elements from a larger demographic for a wider range of political affiliations would benefit from future research as well.